Wednesday, July 13, 2005

More from Missouri

Big round bales in the late evening sun:
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Corn that's as high as an elephant's eye:
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(and it's so tasty, too!)
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Cousins learning to dowse for water.
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Aunt who still does all the cooking for family gatherings even when we try to help.
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9 comments:

Erudite Redneck said...

Daddy ER was an ocassional dowser! And the insides of that there house looks not unlike the one I grew up and others of my clan that I spent time. Makes me homesick -- but the home I miss is in time, not space. Sigh.

Larry said...

Love the pics.....

Just thought I'd say HI!!! I haven't commented in a while....

Hope all is well....

Larry

TECH said...

Impressive photos as always. And as always, thanks for sharing them with us!

FrenziedFeline said...

I've been staring at it, but can't figure it out. What's dowsing and how is it done? Perhaps I know it by another name.

It's still hard for me to get used to round bales of hay, having grown up on rectangle ones, but I guess nothing stays the same, huh?

The pics makes me wish we had been able to go to Wyoming for the 4th. :)

Trixie said...

Dowsing is also called "witching for water." My uncle on this side uses two straight pieces of wire that he bent to have an L-shaped handle. You take the wires, one in each hand, and hold your arms straight out. Then you swing the wires in a circle for a minute, and then hold them straight out in front of you. As you cross over a water line or underground water source, the wires will cross.
(You can tell by my cousins' expressions that it worked for them as well. They were a bit incredulous.)
Now, my grandfather on my dad's side would use a forked branch (one that looks like a wishbone. Peach is a particularly good variety of wood to use.) You hold the two branches of the Y in your hands, palms up, with the long single branch level with the ground. When you walk over a water line or underground water source, the branch will pull downward, pointing at the ground.

Trixie said...

Hey Larry, good to see you posting again! How are you?

FrenziedFeline said...

Oh good, my ruralness remains in tact--I know by witching. :)

The Girl said...

I always enjoy coming here to see your pictures. They're great!!

night-rider said...

A gold prospector in a little town in western New South Wales showed me how to douse using two pieces of strong wire (similar to coathanger wire) and they crossed over water. It's the most amazing feeling to hold them in your hands when they start moving. One of life's mysteries. Great pics again -loved the ears of corn.